Weekly bits of interest – 9 May 2011

Developments and articles of interest from the last two weeks:

  • The Finalists of the 2011 Australian Excellence in eGovernment Awards have been announced.
  • Jorge Barba looks at whether you can innovate if you do not love what you do. “What I will argue is that you can become passionate about just about anything if you have the right intent in mind. The context, topic, initiative is just the vehicle towards your purpose.”1
  • In this post Scott Anthony looks at the architecture of innovation. “The lesson? When you’re thinking about architecting innovation, remember the value of rapid prototypes, to focus on impact, and to match the skills of the team to the task.”2
  • Scott Berkun considers a provocative point – that innovation is aided by the passing of the guard. “For managers and leaders of all kinds, perhaps the best way to make progress happen is to start getting out of the way.”3
  • In this piece Nicolas Bry considers the different models of organisational innovation and how organisations need to adapt their approach to their own situation.

As always, please feel free to identify any other developments or articles of interest in the comments below.

  1. This quote is not covered by the Creative Commons licence or Commonwealth Copyright. From “Do you love creating?” 5 May 2011 by Jorge Barba accessed at http://www.game-changer.net/2011/05/05/do-you-love-creating/
  2. This quote is not covered by the Creative Commons licence or Commonwealth Copyright. From “Better Innovation Architecting” 6 May 2011 by Scott Anthony accessed at http://blogs.hbr.org/anthony/2011/05/better_innovation_architecture.html
  3. This quote is not covered by the Creative Commons licence or Commonwealth Copyright. From “Innovation by Death: A Theory” 29 April 2011 by Scott Berkun accessed at http://www.scottberkun.com/blog/2011/innovation-by-death-a-theory/
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2 comments

  1. Can you innovate if you do not love what you do?

    This resonates well and is a critical question. It seems to me that a fair number of public servants do love what they do. The trouble with the public service is that it does not know how to leave such people alone.

    Worse than that (though I would say mostly unintentionally), agencies often adopt processes that kill the off the passion. The assumption seems to be that passion (or love), equates to subjectivity and, therefore, must be restrained. Which says a lot about the grip of managerialism.

  2. An interesting post from Scott Berkun for sure.

    Raises the question in my mind as to whether some of the approaches and reactions to social media on the part of leaders and senior management are due to a fear that social media is the instrument of their demise.

    If that is true shouldn’t we treat social media as a weapon for change rather than a benign tool? That is, a weapon to expedite demise and transformation.